Seeking the Self under Colonialism: The Intimate Enemy by Ashis Nandy

“Survival of the fittest.” While the phrase was proposed to explain Darwin’s theory of evolution and referred to reproductive fitness, it has come to mean something else in common parlance and social sciences. The word ‘fittest’ for the latter usually means physical strength. We’ve grown up hearing that the strong survive and the weak die. […] Seeking the Self under Colonialism: The Intimate Enemy by Ashis Nandy Continue reading Seeking the Self under Colonialism: The Intimate Enemy by Ashis Nandy

Hummingbirds and Bees

The world of animals is endlessly fascinating. I discover a new fact every other day that blows my mind. For instance, I read about hummingbirds today and found that they are faster than the space shuttle! Their wings are so fast that they appear like a shimmering blur to our eyes. These little birds can also stay suspended in the air for upto an hour, fly backwards and even upside down! These kinds of incredible acts require an enormous amount of energy, which means that their diet in terms of the bodyweight is the largest of any vertebrate. Each hummingbird … Continue reading Hummingbirds and Bees

What does an average person think about in the middle of a pandemic?

I have sometimes read about times of crises in history and wondered what an average person during those times was thinking. Of course, we also have several narratives telling us just that. Chernobyl Prayer: Voices from Chernobyl (1997) by Svetlana Alexievich is coming to mind right now since it records testimonies of various survivors of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986, giving us glimpses of what life looked like on ground in the middle of the catastrophe. I remember this particularly vivid extract about how the world war era had conditioned people to expect big catastrophes in the form of … Continue reading What does an average person think about in the middle of a pandemic?

Lived experience and feminism twice-removed

My introduction to feminism happened in college. I studied English in my undergraduate years, in which we had at least a few courses dedicated to feminist theory and literature, although a feminist perspective was acknowledged and assumed by pretty much any literary theory we studied. It was a big revelation for someone like me (and most of my classmates) who had never come across such ideas in school or at home. It overturned a lot of my assumptions and shook my complacency in major ways. It helped me see the various forms of oppression that me and those around me … Continue reading Lived experience and feminism twice-removed